Remote Gaming Resources

This is a repository of information for people trying to play games online with a moderately large group.  For more information on how we’ve been playing see the accompanying article or the meeting reports.

In each case, boardGOATS has at least one hard copy of the game and uses those components where possible with some additional material as necessary.  If you would like help playing any of these games with your group, get in touch and we’ll do what we can.

 


6 Nimmt! (on Board Game Arena)
Card madness with bulls’ heads, for up to ten players.

Requirements:

  • Accounts on Board Game Arena – one per player.
  • Computing devices – one per player.

Comments:

  • The “Professional Variant” available from Board Game Arena adds a whole new level of madness.

Links:

6 Nimmt! on Board Game Arena

 


Camel Up (on Tabletop Simulator)
Camel racing and betting for lots of players.

Requirements:

  • At least one player on Tabletop Simulator.

Comments:

  • As with all games played on the simulator, it is best to set the camera to view everything from above, but this means it is very difficult to see the different colours when camels are stacked.  It is also difficult to pick them up.  For this reason, rotate all the camels so they stand at slightly different angles, they will still stack (with care) but will be easier to see and pick up.
  • With lots of players it is a good idea to use the longer track provided by the expansion, though none of the other modules.
  • We set the game up with an area at the top of the player area to store tiles and asked players to keep track of their own funds.

Links:

Camel Up on Tabletop Simulator

 


Cartographers:  A Roll Player Tale
Communal colouring and map making for up to ten players or more.

Requirements:

  • Cards from the original game.
  • A printout of the map sheet per player.
  • Coloured pens per player (ideally red, blue, green, brown and purple).

Comments:

  • When playing, use the solo player rules for for the ambush cards and don’t add an ambush on the first round on the first play.
  • Sharing photos of the end result is amazingly good fun.

Links:

Cartographers: A Roll Player Tale

 


ClipCut Parks
Communal cutting-out for up to ten players.

Requirements:

  • Die from the original game.
  • Printouts of the park sheets and Park cards (including bonus chart) per player, printed single sided.
  • A marker pen, a pair of scissors and one six-sided die per player.

Comments:

  • Start with each player rolling the die to determine which layout they will be using and then cut it out. If they roll a five or a six, they re-roll. Each player then rolls the die another four times to determine which two cards they start with, again re-rolling if necessary. During the game, when a park is completed, players roll dice to select the new one.
  • To use the “Grand Parks”, decide in advance which cards these will be (suggest the first, third and fifth).

Links:

ClipCut Parks

 


Crappy Birthday
Gift giving party game.

Requirements:

  • Several copies of the game.

Comments:

  • This has to be played over two sessions: “Present Wrapping” and “Present Opening”.  In the first part players choose the gifts they are going to give.  This can be from a private deck delivered in advance, or from snaps sent electronically, the latter takes more preparation.  The list and cards are then returned to the organiser who arranges the “Special Delivery”.
  • The “Single Year” variant where everyone has one birthday, helps to prevent the game from outstaying its welcome and from cards being recycled (they lose their freshness when seen a second time).

Links:

Crappy Birthday

 


Finstere Flure (aka Fearsome Floors; on Tabletop Simulator)

Racing to escape from a dungeon without getting caught by the monster.  Formally plays seven, but could play more.

Requirements:

  • At least one player on Tabletop Simulator.

Comments:

  • It is very hart to distinguish some of the pieces when they are flipped to their “Dark Side”.  Changing their shapes can make some of them more distinguishable.

Links:

Finstere Flure on Tabletop Simulator

 


HexRoller
Roll and Write” network planning and area control game for eight (or more) players.

Requirements:

  • The dice from the original game.
  • A printout of the player board per player.
  • Pen or pencil per person.

Links:

HexRoller

 


Las Vegas
Dice rolling and push-your luck fun for eight players.

Requirements:

  • Components from the original game.
  • Components from the expansion.
  • A set of dice per player.

Comments:

  • Each player can roll their own dice, call out what they’ve got so the “hosts” can display them and everyone else can see and chip in with “encouragement”.

Links:

Las Vegas

 


Las Vegas Royale
Dice rolling and push-your luck fun for more than five players.

Requirements:

  • Components from the original game.
  • A set of dice per player.

Comments:

  • The game officially only plays five, but as the base game plays more, there is no reason this can’t too, though there is a lot of downtime and the game can get over-long; playing two rounds helps with this.
  • Each player can roll their own dice, call out what they’ve got so the “hosts” can display them and everyone else can see and chip in with “encouragement”.
  • Beware of players hoarding “jetons” as it can add a lot of time at the end when players spend them all at once.  Options to prevent this include topping up to a maximum of two at the end of each round.

Links:

Las Vegas Royale

 


Noch Mal! (aka Encore!)
Roll and Write” game for up to ten (or more) players.

Requirements:

  • The dice from the original game.
  • A copy of the player board per player.
  • Marker pen per person.

Links:

Noch Mal!

 


On Tour
Roll and Write” route planning game for eight players (or more).

Requirements:

  • The dice from the original game.
  • Player boards for each player.
  • A pen, or better a pencil per person.

Comments:

  • The second edition includes dry-wipe boards and pens, and plays eight out of the box, though with more copies it will play more people.
  • Analysis Paralysis is a potential issue with this game, so with lots of people, a method for saying “ready” is helpful.

Links:

On Tour

 


Patchwork Doodle
Roll and Write” style game for six players (or more).

Requirements:

  • The die, meeple, and cards from the original game.
  • A printout of the player board for each player.
  • A selection of coloured pens or pencils per person.

Comments:

  • Although a selection of colouring pens/pencils is not essential, it adds something and makes sharing photos of the end result more fun.

Links:

Patchwork Doodle

 


Railroad Ink: Deep Blue Edition
Roll and Write” network planning game for ten (or more) players.

Requirements:

  • The dice from the original game.
  • A printout of the player board per player.
  • Marker pen per person.

Comments:

  • Although the game includes dry-wipe boards and pens, a printout is available online.

Links:

Railroad Ink: Deep Blue Edition

 


Saboteur (on Board Game Arena)
Hidden traitor fun with dwarves and gold.

Requirements:

  • Accounts on Board Game Arena – one per player.
  • Computing devices – one per player.

Comments:

  • There is scope for more players with the expansion.

Links:

Saboteur on Board Game Arena

 


Second Chance
Communal colouring for up to ten players in the style of Tetris.

Requirements:

  • The cards from the original game.
  • A printout of the player board per player.
  • Colouring pens or pencils.

Comments:

  • Sharing photos of the end result is amazingly good fun.

Links:

Second Chance

 


Tiny Towns
Resource management and area control for lots of players.

Requirements:

  • The cards from the original game.
  • A printout of the player board per player.
  • Resource cubes per player, six of each colour should be plenty.
  • A selection of coloured pens or pencils per person.

Comments:

  • For lots of players, the “Town Hall Variant” is the way forward.
  • There is lots of variety built into the different building cards, and more from the Fortune expansion.
  • When playing with lots of people, you either need a strict time keeper, or some mechanism so people can show they are ready (like “putting hands up” in MS Teams).
  • Sending players a photo of the building cards in advance helps to prevent problems seeing the cards.

Links:

Tiny Towns

 


Troyes Dice
Rondel-driven resource management and planning for lots of people.

Requirements:

  • The rondel and dice from the original game.
  • A printout of the player board per player.
  • A pen per person.

Comments:

  • This is one of the most complex games to play online, but works well.
  • Teaching is always one of the most difficult aspects of playing online, so a player aid is helpful.

Links:

Troyes Dice

 


Tsuro (on Tabletop Simulator)
“The Game of the Path”—really easy to teach and relatively quick to play even with ten.

Requirements:

  • At least one player on Tabletop Simulator.

Comments:

    • With lots of players it is advisable to use the larger board from Tsuro of the Seas.
    • Plays eight natively, but pawns can easily be added to enable more to play.
    • We played offering the active player a choice of two tiles which they could have placed for them in any orientation. Any high symmetry tiles were put to one side and could also be chosen by that player or any following player as long as they were still available.
    • We modified the original version replacing the pieces with large pawns in different colours and the operators set the rotation to 90°.

Links:

Tsuro on Tabletop Simulator

 


Welcome To…
Strategy and building planning for ten players or more.

Requirements:

  • The cards from the original game.
  • A printout of the player board per player.
  • A pen each.

Comments:

  • There are lots and lots of expansion player boards that can be used when players get bored with the original or can be used to add flavour at different times of year (e.g at Easter, Christmas and Halloween).
  • When playing with lots of people, you either need a strict time keeper, or some mechanism so people can show they are ready (like “putting hands up” in MS Teams).

Links:

Welcome To...

 


 

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