1st December 2021

It was a relatively quiet night with no Burgundy, Lilac or Teal.  However, that was slightly offset by the arrival of Lime who had missed the last few and Beige, who is much cuter in real life than on Teams.  The first game of the evening, as Blue and Pink finished their supper, was No Thanks!.  A very simple game where players take a card or pay a chip to pass the problem on, it is easy to play when attention is elsewhere.

No Thanks!
– Image by boardGOATS

At the end of the game, players sum the face value of the cards they collect and the player with the lowest score wins.  The clever part is that if players have a run of cards, they only score the lowest, and the fact that some cards are missing encourages players to gamble.  This time, Blue “top scored” with a massive sixty-six having tried and failed to make a run out of high scoring cards.  Green won with a careful game that gave him thirty points and Pink was took second place, four points behind.

No Thanks!
– Image by boardGOATS

As people arrived, the group split into two with the one group playing the “Feature Game“, Draftosaurus.  This is a very light drafting game, a bit like Sushi Go!, but with dinosaurs (because everyone, especially Beige, likes dinosaurs).  We have played this quite a bit, but mostly online over the last year or so, but the tactile wooden dino-meeples add a lot to the experience.  The basic idea is that players start with a handful of wooden dinosaurs, pick one to keep and then pass the rest on.

Draftosaurus
– Image by boardGOATS

Players then choose which pen to place the dinosaur in obeying the restrictions the pens have for example, each dinosaur placed in the Meadow of Differences must be different.  Players also take it in turns to roll the Placement Die and have to additionally follow the conditions imposed it (e.g placing the dinosaur in an empty pen or a pen that does not contain a Tyrannosaurus rex).  The game is played over two rounds and at the end of the game, when all the dino-meeples have been placed, players add up their scores.

Draftosaurus
– Image by boardGOATS

Each pen scores according to its specialism, with players scoring an extra point for each Tyrannosaurus rex they have have.  Draftosaurus is a very quick and light game, but is also very enjoyable, and this time the scoring was very tight too with just five pints separating first and last places.  Blue just managed to edge it though finishing one point ahead of Pine with Purple and Lime tied in third.

Draftosaurus
– Image by boardGOATS

With five players the options were a little limited, but Pink effectively made the decision as he was keen to play Fabled Fruit, a game we last played two and a half years ago.  This is a game he’s very fond of because he likes the cute animal artwork and bright primary colours.  It is a light card game, with the unusual feature that the game evolves and changes each time it is played.  This “Legacy” style was made popular by Rob Daviau and Matt Leacock with Pandemic Legacy, a game that divided gamers as it required them to destroy components and write over the board, an anathema to people who are accustomed to looking after their games, sometimes to an extreme degree.

Pandemic Legacy: Season 1
– Adapted from image by BGG contributor Muse23PT

Once Pandemic Legacy has been played out, the end product is a personalised copy of Pandemic which embodies the memories of the campaign.  This further irritates some gamers because they feel they are left with a comparatively unplayable copy of the game or at least one that is less well be unbalanced and may have design flaws.  Fabled Fruit is different from the Legacy games as the changes are not destructive, so the game can be reset and played again from the beginning, in this case by simply sorting the cards.

Fabled Fruit
– Image by boardGOATS

The game is quite simple—it starts with six decks of four cards in the central play area and on their turn players move their worker from one pile to another and either carry out the action associated with the cards, or buy a card.  Each card has a cost in fruit and, when bought represents a fruit smoothy.  When a player buys their third card (in the five player game) they trigger the end of the game and the player with the most smoothies at the end of the round wins.

Fabled Fruit
– Image by boardGOATS

The starting decks include simple actions like “take two fruit cards from the deck” and “give one banana to any other player and get two fruits in exchange”.  As the game evolves though, the actions become more interesting with the introduction of a fruit card market and more complex interactions.  This time Blue got out of the blocks quickest and was the first to three with Pine and Purple tied for second.  It was a very enjoyable game and people were just starting to get interested in how the actions were changing and what animal would be introduced next, so the group decided to play it a second time and see what happened.

Fabled Fruit
– Image by boardGOATS

By the second round there was lots of talk about how the some fruit looked like hemorrhoids and from there the conversation deteriorated into a discussion of bum grapes and hairy nuts.  This time, Lime was the victor with Pine taking second place.  As it was packed away and Pink sorted the cards to reset it, the group lamented the “problem” with “Legacy-type” games.  Sadly, they really shine with a small group like a family or household that play together frequently.  The problem with a group like boardGOATS is that people play in different groups each time, so it isn’t really possible to work through a campaign properly.

Fabled Fruit
– Image by boardGOATS

With that, Lime took his leave and there was just time for the remaining foursome (plus Beige) to play a quick game of Coloretto. This distills the essence of the, arguably, better known board game, Zooloretto, into a simple yet clever little card game.  We’ve all played it a lot, so it needed little introduction:  on their turn, players either turn a card and add it to a truck, or take one of the trucks.  The aim is to collect sets, but only the three score positively, the others all score negative points with the player with the most winning.  This time, Blue picked up a couple of full sets and won by a bit of a landslide with Pink in second.

Coloretto
– Image by boardGOATS

Meanwhile, on the next table, Black, Green and Ivory were playing Brass: Birmingham, the Sequel to Brass (Lancashire).  It is an economic strategy game that tells the story of competing entrepreneurs in Birmingham during the industrial revolution, 1770-1870.  Each round, players take turns according to the turn order track, receiving two action points to perform any of the actions:  Build, Network, Develop, Sell, Loan and Scout.  The game is played over two halves: the canal era (years 1770-1830) and the rail era (years 1830-1870).

Brass: Birmingham
– Image by boardGOATS

The game is quite complex so Ivory’s explanation took a little while.  Black had previously read the rules, but Green came in with no prior knowledge, so it was typical that the Start Player application chose Green to go first.  He started the first, Canal part of the game building in the North West, while Ivory went for the Midlands and Black the Mid-South. Black and Ivory were soon linking their routes and connected up to the board edge trading towns. Ivory’s experience of the game meant he was first to use it and collect the Beer barrel.

Brass: Birmingham
– Image by boardGOATS

Green’s routes remained separate from the other two for a while, and although that gave him relatively uninterrupted growth in the region, he found himself limited to only one trade. Thus he pushed south to join up with the other two.  At the halfway point, Ivory was narrowly in the lead over a surprised Green, with Black a few points behind. The board was then cleared and reset. Everyone had managed to build at least a couple of stage two buildings.

Brass: Birmingham
– Image by boardGOATS

As the second, Rail part of the game went on it became clear that everyone had switched places.  Green was building up in the South East, and Ivory was working in the North and Black even further South.  It took much longer to join up the routes so it wasn’t until the very end that players started to build and use resources that others had planned for.  By the end of the game and after the final scoring, Ivory had romped away to a comfortable win, with Black leapfrogging Green into a comfortable second place.

Brass: Birmingham
– Image by boardGOATS

It had been enjoyable, though it was a bit of a rush at the end as time was pressing.  Brass is an unusual game in the way that players can each use the others resources, which is an interesting twist.  With many different options to planning, this makes for quite a thinky game which leaves players feeling they can do so much better the next time.

Brass: Birmingham
– Image by boardGOATS

Learning Outcome:  Beige is a lot smaller in real life.